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2011

YOUTH BOXING
Jason Reblando
January 20 - February 18, 2011

2010

ASSEMBLY: THE FACULTY BIENNIAL EXHIBITION
November 18 2010 - January 14, 2011

ERIK WENZEL: LIVE A LITTLE, LIVE ENNUI
September 30 - November 11, 2010

CENTER OF MULTIPLE MIDDLES
Participating artists: Alberto Aguilar, Madeleine Aguilar, Anna Bolm, Olivia Ciummo, Alex Cohen, Rose DiSalvo, Steven Erst, Susana Garcia, David Kaiser, Jorge Lucero, Gwenn-Aël Lynn, Valerie Magarian, Sean Neilan, Carla Padvoiskis, Zach Parsons, Bryan Saner, Vanessa Smith, Christopher Santiago, Samuel Sotelo, and Veronica Witteman
August 19 - September 24, 2010

Valerie Magarian
Recent Paintings and Animations
July 9 - August 13, 2010

ARBOROMANIA
photographic art works of Larry Chait
May 27 - July 2, 2010


OLD, NEW, BORROWED, BLUE
paintings and sculpture by gARTh
April 15 - May 21, 2010

ROUTINE
includes work by Jess Bader, Heather Coffey, Adarima Grybauskas, Mi-Yeon Kwon and Paul Richter, Carrie Ohm, and Rebecca Walz
March 4 - April 9, 2010

Hard Candy
Helen Maurene Cooper
January 14 - February 26, 2010

2009

Danger Zoners
includes work by Lauren Anderson, Ali Bailey, Loo Bain, Ryan Fenchel, Carson Fisk-Vittori, Erin Foley, George Gittens, Jacob Goodreaux, Geoffrey Hamerlinck, Glenn Hendrick, Peter Hoffman, Caleb Lyons, Carmen Price, Kathryn Scanlan, Pilar Tena, Mike Thibault, Kristen VanDeventer, Philip von Zweck, Nate Wolf and Vanesa Zendejas
December 10 - January 8, 2010

Johannah Silva :: Elastic Phenomena
October 15 – December 4, 2009

end/begin
Karen Azarnia
June 11 – July 17, 2009

Blood Migration
poetry and 19th century alternative process photographs by John Metoyer
April 23 – June 5, 2009

Unity in Diversity
3rd annual City Wide Competition
April 1 – 17, 2009

Southern Graphics Council Memorial Exhibition
Including Leonard Baskin, H. C. Cassill, Anthony Gross, Joseph Hecht, Jules Heller, Anton Heyboer, John Paul Jones, Max Kahn, Kenneth Kerslake, Kent Kirby, Wayne Kline, Misch Kohn, Jacob Landau, Malcolm Myers, Gabor Peterdi, Keith Rasmussen, Michael Rothenstein, Karl Schrag, Bernie Solomon, John Sommers, Julian Trevelyan, William Walmsley, William Wolff, Ross Zirkle, Richard Zoellner, and others.
March 2 - 28, 2009


Faculty Exhibition
Including Alberto Aguilar, Jess Bader, Victoria Beal, Jelena Berenc, Michelle Bolinger, Helen Maureen Cooper, Jennifer Greenburg, Matthew Gregory Hollis, Turtel Onli, Jane Regan, Richard Repasky, Felicity Rich, Armen Sarrafian, Ivanhoe Tejeda, Vassi Vasevski, Marjorie Woodruff, and Craig Yu
December 4, 2008 – February 11, 2009



2008

Masked Production
intersections of ceramics and printmedia, including Jess Bader, Heather Coffey, Jennifer Geisler, Brian Gillis, Ada Rima Grysbauskas, Carrie Ohm, Antonio Pazzi, Derek Walter, and Paul Andrew Wandless
October 2 – November 14, 2008


Anyhere, but where?
including Mat Daly, Peter Hoffman, and Amy E. Mayfield
August 19 – September 26, 2008


Human Intricacies
Paintings, drawings, and prints by Jennifer B. Scott
May 1 – June 13, 2008


Lessons in Looking
March 24 – April 25, 2008


City Wide 2008
March 3 – 14, 2008


Sherry Diaz: Hirsute Pursuits!
(hair pulling and tub drawings)
January 17 – February 29, 2008

 

2007

Michelle Bolinger
November 26, 2007 – January 11, 2008


ie:Between
works by Benjamin Bellas, Justin Cooper, Stuart Keeler, Clinton King, Noelle Mason, Ross Moreno, and Magdalen Wong
October 11 – November 16, 2007


ART_LAB_HWC 2007
Alberto Aguilar with Ev'rythang Sandwich
exhibition includes: May Anuntarungsun, Brittini Duncan, Riley Hall, Jr.,
Thomas Henderson, Brandan Johnson, Darin Miner, Shizuwa Noda,
Shaquill Richberg, and Alyssa Zamayoa

August 27 – October 5, 2007

How it begins, or everything is everything
new prints, drawings and paintings by Richard Repasky
April 19 – June 8, 2007


I'll be your mirror
new paintings and video by Marcelino Stuhmer
March 5 – April 13, 2007


Alberto Aguilar Hardly Works
January 22 – March 2, 2007

City Streets / Country Roads
Ruth Moscovitch
November 20, 2006 – January 19, 2007




2006

Kit Rosenberg
October 5 – November 17, 2006


Displaced Occupation
Anne Heironymous, Aay Preston-Myint, Paul Lloyd Sargent, and Marjorie Woodruff
August – September 30, 2006


Rob Bain: New Works
April 17 – June 2, 2006


Relative
Jennifer Greenburg, Lisa Hecht, John Henley, and Robbin O’Harrow
March 10 – April 7, 2006





YOUTH BOXING
Jason ReblandoJanuary 20 - February 18, 2011

ieThis exhibition focuses on Reblando’s series of documentary photographs taken at the amateur boxing clubs of the Chicago Park District. In Youth Boxing, the work is humanistic, exploring the complex psychology of young boys coming of age in this sporting community. In a statement about the series, Reblando writes “In between intervals of sparring, jumping rope, and pounding on heavy bags, these boxers have brief moments of rest, stillness, and introspection. My goal is to portray these periods of rest as contemplative moments between childhood and adulthood.” Minimal indications of the background setting are shown which focuses attention to the diversity of the young male subject’s emotional circumstances - triumphant, casual, and at times uncertain.
Image credit: Jason Reblando, "Citywide Tournament", 2004, archival inkjet print, 19"x28"

Jason Reblando (b. 1973, Flushing, NY) is a freelance photographer based in Chicago. He received his MFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago, and a BA in Sociology from Boston College. After college, he worked as a community organizer in southern Oregon in the Jesuit Volunteer Corps. He is a recipient of a Follett Fellowship from Columbia College Chicago, a Community Arts Assistance Program grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and an Artist Fellowship Award from the Illinois Arts Council. His photographs are part of the collections in the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Midwest Photographers Project of the Museum of Contemporary Photography, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. His work will be featured in exhibitions this coming year at the Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago and the Minneapolis Photography Center. Reblando’s recent projects explore the people, architecture and landscapes that surround and inhabit government funded programs.



ASSEMBLY: THE FACULTY BIENNIAL EXHIBITION
November 18 2010 - January 14, 2011

ie The faculty of professional artists is the cornerstone of the Department of Art and Architecture at Harold Washington College; their varying backgrounds and experiences create a diverse and stimulating environment for the students to succeed. This exhibition celebrates the work of fifteen faculty members and a few of their collaborators, with works ranging among ceramics, photography, print media, painting, architecture, video and sound. Exhibiting artists include: Alberto Aguilar; Jess Bader and Heather Coffey; Michelle Bolinger; Helen Maurene Cooper; Max Alexander, Davy Bisaro and Balta Pena; Jessica Taylor Caponigro; Turtel Onli; Richard Repasky; Felicity Rich; Galina Shevchenko and Phylum Sinter; Ivanhoe Tejeda; Joseph Trupia; Vassi Vasevski; Rebecca Walz; Craig Yu.
Image credit: Galina Shevchenko with audio by Phylum Sinter, Still from "Things We Desire", 2010.  Video with sound, 17 minutes, 39 seconds.


ERIK WENZEL: LIVE A LITTLE, LIVE ENNUI

September 30 - November 11, 2010

ieThe President's Gallery at Harold Washington College, 30 E. Lake Street, proudly presents the work of Erik Wenzel in a solo show titled Live a Little, Live Ennui from Friday, October 1, through Thursday, November 11. There will be an artist's reception on Thursday, September 30 from 4:30 to 7:00 p.m. in the gallery, room 1105. The exhibition, reception and related series of talks are free and open to the public. In the unique site of the President's Gallery, two places literally inhabit the same space in the form of an exhibition hall that is simultaneously the administrative offices of the college. In cultivating a self-consciousness of this double life of the space, the usual gestures and "furniture" of an art exhibition such as wall text and pedestals are repurposed from their conventional uses as Wenzel explores multiple strategies for supporting the concepts of the show. The third space that is created between the office cubicle and the white cube gallery is the zone where this exploration takes place. As a major component of the exhibition, Wenzel has organized a series of "Evening Academies"– talks, conversations, screenings and discussions occurring weekly in the reception area of the office gallery. These after hours events will be led by presenters Wenzel has invited including: Ethan Breckenridge, Diego Leclery, Marilyn Volkman, Scott Wolniak and more. Participants will play a significant part in determining the shape and content of these collaborative events. For a complete schedule, visit: artoridiocy.blogspot.com Erik Wenzel is an artist living in Chicago. He received his MFA from The University of Chicago in 2009 and his BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003. Recent solo exhibitions include "New 'N Lonelier Laze" and "Warm For Your Formalism" at DOVA temporary and "Belief in Doubt in Painting" at 65GRAND. He co-edited and contributed to "Internal Necessity: a reader tracing the inner logics of the contemporary art field" published by Sternberg Press in August 2010. In 2009 he was a fellow at the Sommerakademie at the Zentrum Paul Klee in Bern, Switzerland. Wenzel has been writing about art and culture on his blog "Art or Idiocy?" since 2004 and is Senior Staff Writer for ArtSlant's Chicago bureau. Live a Little, Live Ennui at Harold Washington College President's Gallery is part of Chicago Artists Month 2010, the fifteenth annual celebration of Chicago's vibrant visual art community coordinated by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, visit www.chicagoartistsmonth.org.
Artist's Website:
www.artoridiocy.blogspot.com


CENTER OF MULTIPLE MIDDLES
Participating artists: Alberto Aguilar, Madeleine Aguilar, Anna Bolm, Olivia Ciummo, Alex Cohen, Rose DiSalvo, Steven Erst, Susana Garcia, David Kaiser, Jorge Lucero, Gwenn-Aël Lynn, Valerie Magarian, Sean Neilan, Carla Padvoiskis, Zach Parsons, Bryan Saner, Vanessa Smith, Christopher Santiago, Samuel Sotelo, and Veronica Witteman
August 19 - September 24, 2010

ieThe President's Gallery at Harold Washington College, 30 E. Lake Street, proudly presents a group show titled Center of Multiple Middles from Friday, August 19, through Friday, September 24. There will be an artist's reception and performance program on Thursday, September 16 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the gallery, room 1105, and an adjacent presentation room. The exhibition, reception and performance presentations are free and open to the public. You are cordially invited to take a walk through Harold Washington College to view window and hallway installations, altered offices and refrigerators, performance presentations and an art gallery in the President's receiving room featuring the work of the following artists: Alberto Aguilar, Madeleine Aguilar, Anna Bolm, Olivia Ciummo, Alex Cohen, Rose DiSalvo, Steven Erst, Susana Garcia, David Kaiser, Jorge Lucero, Gwenn-Aël Lynn, Valerie Magarian, Sean Neilan, Carla Padvoiskis, Zach Parsons, Bryan Saner, Vanessa Smith, Christopher Santiago, Samuel Sotelo, and Veronica Witteman. Through chance and educational encounters, this constellation of artists has formed. The individual artist's participation in this exhibition acts as a "point" that transforms the college into a center of multiple points – or middles – from which the viewer's line of sight is expanded. By activating numerous spaces throughout the college with these varied artworks, ranging from video, mural painting, ceramics, artist books, furniture, drawing and etcetera, layered meanings are revealed.


Valerie Magarian
Recent Paintings and Animations
July 9 - August 13, 2010

ieThis exhibition presents Magarian's recent large-scale paintings and hand-rendered animations in which she crafts epic mythical legends dotted with perplexing humor. Inspired by her childhood stories, the hazy images of her pieces offer ambiguous scenes that shift between sentimentality, morbidity, and oddity. The stories in the works blend biography with the artist's imagination and the subjective space of recollection. Directives for the work begin with hyper real situations such as "My twin brother and I got stuck in a cave and drank water from stalactites to survive." The figures and landscapes are abstracted through her mark-making techniques of staining the canvas with thinned paint and rubbing pastel into the canvas grain. The resulting images are washy with undefined edges - this gives space for the viewer to complete the scene with their own subjective experience. The animations included in the exhibition are "blips" of a larger, unfolding story, while the expansive paintings offer a broad view of the artist's memory scene from a sophisticated vantage point. Valerie Magarian spent her childhood in the Utah desert and in Guatemala and uses her memories from these places to inspire her artwork. She received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from Pomona College. She lives and works in New York where she also teaches studio arts at the Guggenheim Museum and Free Arts NYC. She has exhibited recently at the Ise Cultural Foundation and Lotus in New York City.
(Image credit: "The Son and the Moon", 2009. Pastel on canvas, 45" x 58". )


ARBOROMANIA
photographic art works of Larry Chait
May 27 - July 2, 2010

ieIn ARBOROMANIA, Chait traces common themes through three ongoing photographic series – macro images of decaying leaves, texture studies of bark and a documentary series of whole trees. These images reinforce his interest and obsession with natural processes and forms. The Leaf Decay series transforms holes in decomposing leaves into abstractions that reference images of landscapes as seen from elevated distances. Using this familiar macro view, Chait turns his camera to the bark of different species of trees. The Bark series is surprising as the viewer realizes the textures and colors of this part of the tree that often goes unnoticed. Chait's addition of images of mature trees underscores the larger picture - patterns of growth and decay build the stories present in all three bodies of work. Chait studied Chemistry and Pharmacology before he fully immersed himself in the study of photography, getting his certificate in Digital Photography from Columbia College, Chicago in 2003. He has shown in numerous group and solo shows in Chicago and nationally including the Evanston Biennial and Old Town Art Center, Chicago and Umbrella Arts, New York City. He is represented by Anne Loucks Gallery, Chicago and Glencoe, Illinois.
Image credit: Larry Chait, bark #117, 2009, Digital C-print, 13 1/4" x 11"


OLD, NEW, BORROWED, BLUE
paintings and sculpture by gARTh
April 15 - May 21, 2010

ieOLD, NEW, BORROWED, BLUE presents gARTh’s latest work, spanning in representation from abstract to figurative in a variety of media: digital and traditional painting, mixed media sculpture and ceramic vessels. The pieces included in this exhibition span the varied and experimental bodies of the artist’s works, which move fluidly between contemplative and functional purposes. gARTh draws inspiration for the form and process of his pieces from the many different countries, cities and villages he has traveled throughout his lifetime. His abstract compositions recall the architecture of cities and the structure of the. All the works in the exhibition are untitled to encourage the viewer to join in the creation of the work as a journey towards peace. gARTh is a self-taught, Chicago-based artist born in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has exhibited his works at Around the Coyote and the Field Museum in Chicago and Copper Frog Gallery in Long Grove, Illinois.
Image credit: gARTh, 2010, digital print on paper, 6" x 9"


ROUTINE
includes work by Jess Bader, Heather Coffey, Adarima Grybauskas, Mi-Yeon Kwon and Paul Richter, Carrie Ohm, and Rebecca Walz
March 4 - April 9, 2010

ieRoutine presents seven artists interpreting feminism through a wide variety of media in commemoration of March as Women’s History Month. While all the artists have a background in clay-based work, the themes of the show will be taken on through carving, photography, sculptural installation, and new media performance as well as clay. In this exhibition, images and references to female identity as handed down through the popular culture of past eras are critiqued and deconstructed. Jess Bader’s work consists of an installation of clayware referencing the forms of 1950s china settings, but are glazed with images of Wonder Woman, captured in the moment before she spins, using her powers to transport herself to another place. Heather Coffey’s fragile installation of printed aprons memorializes the art of women’s labor, as past generations have known it. Mi-Yeon Kwon and Paul Richter’s live performance and off-site installation give multiple readings of gestures as they are transmitted between the gallery and an off-site projection. Through the displacement of time and media, the works on display emphasize questions about how ideas and figures from the past are viewed in the present moment. Routine includes work by Jess Bader, Heather Coffey, Adarima Grybauskas, Mi-Yeon Kwon and Paul Richter, Carrie Ohm, and Rebecca Walz. Harold Washington College is one of the seven City Colleges of Chicago. The President’s Gallery is located inside Harold Washington College, 30 East Lake Street, Room 1105. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and by appointment. For more information, contact the Harold Washington College art department at 312-553-5738.

Image credit: Jess Bader


Hard Candy
Helen Maurene Cooper
January 14 - February 26, 2010

ieHard Candy presents recent large-scale photographs that stage Chicago-centered trends in synthetic nail design among surreal sets of luscious colors and textures. In her current work, the artist performs and directs using visual cues linked to participation in specific subcultures in an effort to expose and re-mix the relationships the viewer has to them. The photographs in this exhibition are suggestive. The information we are given about the subject of each photo is limited by cropping which gives the viewer room to make his or her own associations about the bodies that are represented. The exploration of codes of femininity and how they relate to the performance of race and class exist in tandem with the seductive, glossy surfaces of these images. The participation of members of the Harold Washington College community as the artist’s “nail crushes” and the anonymous craftsperson who painted the nails were integral to the creation of these works. Cooper received her BA from Bard College in New York in 2003 and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2007. Her work has been exhibited at Versionfest, Estudio Tres and Barbara and Barbara Gallery, Chicago; Third Ward, Brooklyn, New York; and at Clairemorris Gallery, Clairemorris, Ireland. Her work will be featured in Chicago at David Weinberg Gallery, the O'Connor Art Gallery at Dominican University, and Hendershot Gallery, New York City, this winter.

Image credit: Helen Maurene Cooper, Fluorescents on Orange with Sparkles, Inkjet, 2009.


Danger Zoners
includes work by Lauren Anderson, Ali Bailey, Loo Bain, Ryan Fenchel, Carson Fisk-Vittori, Erin Foley, George Gittens, Jacob Goodreaux, Geoffrey Hamerlinck, Glenn Hendrick, Peter Hoffman, Caleb Lyons, Carmen Price, Kathryn Scanlan, Pilar Tena, Mike Thibault, Kristen VanDeventer, Philip von Zweck, Nate Wolf and Vanesa Zendejas
December 10 - January 8, 2010

ieDanger Zoners showcases selected models, assemblages, gifts, collections and video sketches from the artist’s working spaces in the context of a gallery exhibition, revealing the processes and content of their larger bodies of work. Twenty artists are featured with works in a wide range of media including, but not limited to painting, drawing, video, print media, installation, and architecture. In conversation with the current citywide inquiry into the ideas and structures surrounding the artist studio, this exhibition focuses on the objects that give visual and conceptual stimuli for artists in their working environment. These pieces are art for the artist – they do not seek appreciation or discourse outside of the studio. They serve to reveal personal, idiosyncratic ideas about the company the individual’s creative process keeps. The participating artists work in unstructured community with each other and their ideas, which will encourage connection and dialogue between the pieces.

 

 



Johannah Silva :: Elastic Phenomena

October 15 – December 4, 2009

ieElastic Phenomena includes paintings and watercolors from Silva’s ongoing exploration of layering and connecting colorful circular forms. Her interest in the viewer’s changing interactions with the work will be present with a piece that is reconfigured from a previous installation. Silva’s images are rich spaces of color and form that fluctuate between micro and macro levels of perception. They begin with gestures and slowly build to create networks of layered spaces where the understanding of foreground and background is the product of surprising, vibrating color relationships. These color and space relations sustain opposite states by bouncing between form and formlessness and stillness and movement.

 

 

Image credit: Johannah Silva, Swarm 2008. Acrylic on canvas, 20" x 20". Image courtesy of the artist.


end/begin
Karen Azarnia
June 11 – July 17, 2009

ieKaren Azarnia’s interest is in moments that define character: images of the threshold of change. As though each painting is a film still, the before and after of the frame is inconsequential in comparison to what the gesture emotes. The import of the image negates surrounding events that are irrelevant in comparison to the fluidity between action and cogitation. The ephemeral images in end/begin emphasize the brevity of the moment. While Azarnia’s paintings demand an attention to beauty, they also point to an intricate tension, concurrently exposing character strength and weakness. In this exhibition, Azarnia’s images range from portraits to relationships between mother and daughter to representational-related abstractions. Throughout her work, body language has been described to the minutest detail; however, these new works incorporate image obliteration through washes and wiping, further editing the image to the core of the subject.

 

 

Image credit: Karen Azarnia, Emerge (detail), 2009. Oil on linen. Image courtesey of the artist.


Blood Migration
poetry and 19th century alternative process photographs by John Metoyer
April 23 – June 5, 2009

ieBlood Migration is a recently published volume of John Metoyer’s writings and photographs. Although not initially intended as a single body of work, Blood Migration is a transport through facets of the human condition and its subsequent struggle between the spiritual and the material. Addressing relationships, identity, and death, the poetry draws upon family history, found diaries, and letters, telling of physical and mental toils and the comfort and loneliness of solitude. John Metoyer’s photographs can be described as surreal, questioning the necessity of the physical and the burdens that materials imply; yet a significant source of inspiration is the history of photography itself. Early camera techniques that gave rise to spirit photography and visual hoaxes, quickly shattered the validity of the photograph as a document of truth. Metoyer uses the techniques to and end that are more appropriately considered visual poetry, exposing truths as personalized internal ventures. John Metoyer teaches English and Photography, and serves as Dean of Instruction at Harold Washington College. Blood Migration was published in a limited edition by Leo and Wolfe Photography.

 

 

 

Image Credit: John Metoyer, Africa, 2000. Ambrotype (contemporary materials). Image courtesey of the artist.


Unity in Diversity
3rd annual City Wide Competition
April 1 – 17, 2009

ieUnity in Diversity is the 3rd annual City Wide Juried Art Competition, featuring student artworks from the City Colleges of Chicago.


Southern Graphics Council Memorial Exhibition
Including Leonard Baskin, H. C. Cassill, Anthony Gross, Joseph Hecht, Jules Heller, Anton Heyboer, John Paul Jones, Max Kahn, Kenneth Kerslake, Kent Kirby, Wayne Kline, Misch Kohn, Jacob Landau, Malcolm Myers, Gabor Peterdi, Keith Rasmussen, Michael Rothenstein, Karl Schrag, Bernie Solomon, John Sommers, Julian Trevelyan, William Walmsley, William Wolff, Ross Zirkle, Richard Zoellner, and others.
March 2 - 28, 2009

ieNot long ago, printmaking programs were rare in the United States. Many programs that exist today were pioneered by members of the Southern Graphics Council. These founders, teachers, and mentors were innovators in the field through the revival of engraving, the invention and development of collagraphs, mixed media prints, big prints, color prints, waterless and psychadelic lithography. This exhibition highlights the works of groundbreaking print artists. Southern Graphics Council Memorial Exhibition is organized by David B. Johnson, Associate Professor, Ball State University.



Faculty Exhibition
Including Alberto Aguilar, Jess Bader, Victoria Beal, Jelena Berenc, Michelle Bolinger, Helen Maureen Cooper, Jennifer Greenburg, Matthew Gregory Hollis, Turtel Onli, Jane Regan, Richard Repasky, Felicity Rich, Armen Sarrafian, Ivanhoe Tejeda, Vassi Vasevski, Marjorie Woodruff, and Craig Yu
December 4, 2008 – February 11, 2009

ieFantasy, deterioration, experience, issues of the self, and humor are a sampling of the varied concepts embodied by the works in this exhibition. Ivanhoe Tejeda’s photo collage examines the conceptual reality of home through images of the environs where he lives, inlaid into a floorplan of what is architecturally considered to be his home. Marjorie Woodruff’s vessel uses decoration as a confrontational element to illustrate atrocities of war and torture. Jess Bader’s slipcast porcelain log cabins address idealized Americana facing off with gender identity of the rugged romantic. Frequent with his practice, Craig Yu’s monochromatic painting create a sense of trauma through disorientation where time, place, and specifics of imagery are indecipherable, and a book by Jelena Berenc presents an example of her durational self-portraits: an autobiographical record of self consciousness over a period of 30 days. 

Vassi Vasevski, Lake of Peaches, 2007. Acrylic on canvas.



Masked Production
intersections of ceramics and printmedia, including Jess Bader, Heather Coffey, Jennifer Geisler, Brian Gillis, Ada Rima Grysbauskas, Carrie Ohm, Antonio Pazzi, Derek Walter, and Paul Andrew Wandless
October 2 – November 14, 2008

ieMasked Production exemplifies the utility of clay and the print as multiple and edition producing media. While commercial manufacture provides items for the masses, the creative basis for objects that evolve from the compromise between form and function, while craft and design influence the aesthetic. The works in this exhibition consider the cast, the mold, relief, stamp, screen, and decal, demonstrating the range with which fabrication takes place.

For many artists working with these media, the multiple functions as visual alliteration. Patterns are incorporated to exemplify storytelling, histories are given perspective through text, and socio-political issues are addressed with images on repetitive shapes. The broadcast of ideas is facilitated by the physical existence of multiple objects, the catalyst for communication.
Photo credit: Jess Bader.



Anyhere, but where?
including Mat Daly, Peter Hoffman, and Amy E. Mayfield
August 19 – September 26, 2008

ieAnyhere, but where? considers the scope of landscape imagery from the serene to the strange.  As landscapes, these works do not intentionally describe the likeness of a specific place. What is presented are indications of an acquaintance, encounter, or recollection where reality is negotiable. These works linger along the boundary between the factual and the imagined, from the past or from the future, begotten by memory and experience.



Peter Hoffman, Sunrise on Grandma's Chocolate Lake, 2007. Acrylic on canvas.



Human Intricacies
Paintings, drawings, and prints by Jennifer B. Scott
May 1 – June 13, 2008

ieScott’s work focuses on the non-discriminatory nature of disasters such as hurricane Katrina and the Indian Ocean tsunamis of late 2004. The vast destruction of human life left survivors in shock, horrified, and helplessly overwhelmed. Tragedy and death gradually become apparent through the composition of the figures: lying, wading, watching, or turning away. Despite the lack of direct confrontation from the subjects depicted, the works command attention via color, contrast, composition or the gaze of the subjects.

Jennifer B. Scott, Boys on a Tree, 2006. Oil on board.



Lessons in Looking
Including: Jung Hee Lee, Nikki Markin, Antoinette Merchant, Jamel Moore,

Matthew Murray, Shizuwa Noda, Kimberly Prowell, Nancy Rios, Evelyn Sanford, Ronald Schrimer, Aya Suzuki, Cordarice Thomas, Yuko Uemura, Carrie Vasquez, Ana Velazquez, Christina Villalpando, Margarette Ware, Anika L. Williams, and Ifé Williams
March 24 - April 25, 2008

ieThe conceptual viewfinder is the primary tool used to initiate communication between the artist and audience. A story may be told through an image, series of frames, or the choice of material to represent the image. This exhibition requires the viewer to become engaged with both the material choice of the objects as well as the conveyed subject. Striking positions between viewer and subject often question the audience’s perspective of what is seen when looking everyday.

 

Kimberly Prowell, A Closer Look, 2007. Ink on paper.



City Wide 2008
March 3 – 14, 2008

ie



Sherry Diaz: Hirsute Pursuits!
(hair pulling and tub drawings)

January 17 – February 29, 2008

ieOften working with found materials and experimental techniques, Diaz has turned to her personal and constant discards to reflect on both the internal and external impulses of the day to day. Somewhere between the meditative tending of a Japanese rock garden and musical improvisation lies the drive and inspiration for these images.

The forms, culled from wads of hair in the bath, begin as a negotiation between order and disorder, structure and freedom. The wads are indeterminate, their open-endedness providing the springboard for their fictive nature. The drawings reveal themselves through the manipulation of the media.

This body of work emanates from the quality of a line, the volume of a form, and an innate compulsion to balance order and chaos. Much like meditation, the drawings are an essential daily exercise. The simplicity of the materials, hair and water on porcelain, have a beauty, glow and dimension that are inwardly personal and yet outwardly reflective, but observations all the same. Like watching clouds or examining wood grain, the shapes of the images are playful and familiar, and at the same time, the act of drawing provides a vehicle to understand ideas and interactions between vision, body, and material.

Sherry Diaz, Tree, 2007. Inkjet print mounted on fiberboard, 8" x 8" x 1.5".



Michelle Bolinger
November 26, 2007 – January 11, 2008

ieLandscape representations are often inspired by form, color and light, and an artist will make deliberate choices to successfully render three dimensions on a two dimensional plane. Through the simultaneous process of flattening and molding, the image becomes an interpretation and will inevitably vary from what is “real” or “present” in the referenced space.

While memory rarely preserves every detail, elements pertinent to distinct characteristics of the place are retained such as color, light, shape, and relative position. In these paintings, color is used to relay a variety of significant aspects about the spaces. The pre-dawn yellows of Pellet contrast hot urban hues of In/North. The saturated greens of Was convey a particular time of day, season, and topography, as opposed to the misty atmosphere and receding space of Over/Across. The forms in the landscapes are executed with confidence and determination, and they incessantly validate their permanence in the space the artist has created.

Michelle Bolinger paints both from memory and constructed still life. Using these devices, she strips a landscape to its crucial elements in order to describe its essence. When working on canvas, edits become physical by scraping and abrading the painted surface. On the contrary, her most recent works on paper are rendered landscapes positioned within a void. These minimal compositions are clear and immediate, preserving only the absolute nub of the place. In either instance of canvas or paper, the viewer is invited to experience and move through the fantastic space she has created.

Michelle Bolinger, Over, 2007. Oil, pencil, colored pencil and pastel on canvas paper, 16" x 20".



ie:Between
works by Benjamin Bellas, Justin Cooper, Stuart Keeler, Clinton King, Noelle Mason, Ross Moreno, and Magdalen Wong
October 11 – November 16, 2007

ieMedia such as performance, photography, sculpture, and video serve to manifest each individual’s vision. These diverse artistic sensibilities contribute to provocative points of conjunction and are represented in works that make use of surveillance, musical scores, vaudeville act, and scientific schematics.  Interactions with objects, strangers, companions, and the self set up platforms to examine relationships, and their success and failure. Between considers these interactions by focusing on the space between object and viewer.



ART_LAB_HWC 2007
Alberto Aguilar with Ev'rythang Sandwich
exhibition includes: May Anuntarungsun, Brittini Duncan, Riley Hall, Jr.,
Thomas Henderson, Brandan Johnson, Darin Miner, Shizuwa Noda,
Shaquill Richberg, and Alyssa Zamayoa

August 27 – October 5, 2007

artlabART_LAB_HWC is an annual artist residency that brings Chicago area teens and Harold Washington College art students together with professional artists. The program is a month-long extension of studio practice for both resident artists and HWC art students, and is designed to encourage youth to collaborate, to stimulate creativity, to initiate partnership and leadership roles, as well as collectively develop a group identity. Through the collaborative process, ART_LAB participants develop critical thinking, problem solving, and project management skills. Through group interaction and art making within a non-hierarchical setting, the classic idea of artist as individual is challenged. Random experiments evolve and creative exchange flows. As a result, no idea is taken for granted as the dialogue between object and maker expands, realizing art works that challenge parameters of traditional artistic categories.

Alberto Aguilar with Ev'rythang Sandwich, SIAM DUNK, 2007. Digital photograph.



How it begins, or everything is everything

new prints, drawings and paintings by Richard Repasky
April 19– June 8, 2007

repaskyOne of many aesthetic qualities, Repasky is interested in interpretations of beauty. The images beg attention be paid to the details painstakingly rendered and printed layer upon layer. He utilizes a variety of printing processes such as stone and multi-plate color lithography, screen printing, and toner transfers, as well as the use of a pencil, a metal point, and a “hairy stick” to render his images. The intricate draftsmanship and detail of the images aim to mirror a particular examination of humanity. There are discomforts and repulsions that offer moments, or holes, where one may have a revelation or transcendent understanding of beauty. The artist asks that we not give credence to surface matter alone, but reflect and understand the depth and complexity of seemingly simple interactions and restrain knee-jerk reactions

Repasky working on Untitled – Demand, stone lithograph in black, 2007



I'll be your mirror
new paintings and video by Marcelino Stuhmer
March 5 – April 13, 2007

"I am exhibiting a selection of paintings from a continuing series called I'll be your mirror. To make these paintings, I intentionally use a material and process that is difficult to control; I put down a thick layer of industrial enamel and work wet-in-wet into that surface. I'm interested in incorporating the accidental or uncontrollable into the process of representation, to isolate the moment when a mental image of an experience is just about to form. The photographic sources of the paintings range from film stills, news imagery, found photos and my own photographs, so working from these various sources is a way to acknowledge an inclusive visual "narrative" from both real and imaginary experience.

The video I just happened to be the one that was there (2007) is a "mash-up" juxtaposition of 4 separate elements: a personal account from the first police officer on the scene at the recent Salt Lake City mall shooting, video images of flowing enamel, audio from a Cold War instructional film about "mind control", and a suspenseful piece of music by contemporary composer Lee Hyla. I want each audio or visual layer to retain its individuality, while experienced together they create a rich sensory driven narrative. It's like coming into someone's living room where the voice on the radio mixes with the war image on TV, just as an ambulance siren is heard going by the apartment building. That's the kind of sensory juxtaposition I'm interested in pursuing."

Marcelino Stummer, Come Close, 2007. Oil enamel on panel, 24" x 24".



Alberto Aguilar Hardly Works
January 22 – March 2, 2007

Alberto Aguilar explores the ways in which daily occurrences influence, reference, and contribute to ideas about art (painting and art history) and process through photography, video, sound, and installation. Everyday life becomes studio practice in the sense that every decision is an aesthetic choice, including absorbing particular influences from the people around him, as well as intentionally collaborating with other artists, as evident with Aguilar’s sound works with his children and the video and photography works with the Tumultuous Beloveds. Using everyday objects and activities as his media, images are composed, songs are invented, and objects are formally arranged. The works become a reflection of the many “truths about life and human experience, but also remain absurd and humorous.” According to Aguilar, the “main premise for the exhibition is my desire not to make works, but to have life experiences, daily routine, life residue and collaborative exchange sit in as my artistic output, hence Alberto Aguilar Hardly Works.”

Alberto Aguilar, And It Was Good, 2006. Injet on paper.



City Streets / Country Roads
Ruth Moscovitch
November 20, 2006 – January 19, 2007

This exhibition presents whimsical renderings of the street corners, alleys, and hotdog stands that are uniquely part of Chicago, contrasted by serene yet gently humorous farm scenes from northern Illinois. Unusual architectural detail, textures of buildings, contrast of shadow and light, and the inevitable intersection of power lines through our sights are motifs that Moscovitch utilizes to emphasize the often overlooked details in her compositions.


Ruth Moscovitch, Budacki's Hot Dogs, 2005. Etching on Fabriano Rosapina White.



Kit Rosenberg
October 5 - November 17, 2006

Material is essential to the conceptual nature of these recent portraits by Kit Rosenberg. Utilizing detritus collected as drawing material physically embeds the essence of the subject in the portrait, through remnants of skin and hair, which are prominent contributors to household dust. These portraits evoke ephemeral notions that are both sublime and poetic, conjuring associations with constant personal changes over time, as well as the continual rejuvenation of the self through shedding and growth.


Kit Rosenberg, Eddy, 2006. Dust, shoe polish, and beeswax on glass



Displaced Occupation
Anne Heironymous, Aay Preston-Myint, Paul Lloyd Sargent,
and Marjorie Woodruff

August 28 – September 29, 2006

Displaced Occupation examines ideas about preparing for, observing, and adapting to conditions of war, including the slippery slope between defensive and offensive preparations for such conditions. Our nation’s soldiers are constantly sent overseas for the purposes of defending democracy, preserving peace, and maintaining economic interests. Recently, contractors have replaced military units in war-stricken countries, performing maintenance and reconstruction efforts in the name of peace, democracy, and economy. Free from military conflict on our nation’s mainland, diverse perceptions have come into being about what it means to live in the midst of bomb blasts, missiles, and gunfire. Most Americans have not personally experienced living in a war-torn state. This privilege limits our understanding of military occupation, and is both filtered and fed through various news reporting, movies, cartoons, histories, memoirs, blogs, cartoons, toys, and games. While these sources have the ability to romanticize, glorify, and horrify audiences, the audience also has the freedom to accept, ignore, or criticize the information presented.


Anne Heironymous, Untitled (detail), 2006. Graphite and press type on paper.


Rob Bain: New Works
April 17 - June 2, 2006

Rob Bain’s latest series is a continuation of his interest in the limits painting has met throughout the history of art. In these works, “the monochrome is emblematic of both the highest achievement of painting, and also the failure of painting as an expressive medium. (He is) using the monochromatic scheme to both complete the paintings and simultaneously utilizing enamel to eliminate or erase/deface the same paintings.” Reminiscent of the ideas that drove both Malevich’s "Black Square" and Rauschenberg’s "Erased deKooning Drawing", Rob Bain’s paintings twist the identity that conceptual painters have been pitched against since the advent of the monochrome.

Rob Bain, Monochrome, 2006. Sand oil and enamel on canvas, 50" x 52".


Relative
Jennifer Greenburg, Lisa Hecht, John Henley, and Robbin O’Harrow
March 10 – April 7, 2006

Material, subject matter, and history are related facets of the art-making process used to articulate ideas through visual cues. The conflation of material as subject, figure merging with ground, repetitive motifs, narrative, and historical reference all illustrate the range of conceptual relativity. Within this set of criteria, we become aware of the constant fluctuation between the exceptional and the mundane assigned to people, objects, and moments in time.

Robbin O'Harrow, installation view of monoprints, 2006.